Dementia quality of life instrument: construct and concurrent validity in patients with mild to moderate dementia

S Voigt-Radloff, R Leonhart, M Schützwohl, L Jurjanz, T Reuster, A Gerner, K Marschner, F van Nes, M Graff, M Vernooij-Dassen, M O Rikkert, V Holthoff, M Hüll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To translate the Dementia quality of life instrument (DQoL) into German and assess its construct and concurrent validity in community-dwelling people with mild to moderate dementia.

METHODS: Dementia quality of life instrument data of two pooled samples (n=287) were analysed regarding ceiling and floor effects, internal consistency, factor reliability and correlations with corresponding scales on quality of life (Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease and SF-12), cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - cognitive), depression (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia) and activities of daily living (Interview of Deterioration in Daily Living Activities in Dementia).

RESULTS: We found no floor effects (<2%), minor ceiling effects (1-11%), moderate to good internal consistency (Cronbach's α: 0.6-0.8) and factor reliability (0.6-0.8), moderate correlations with self-rated scales of quality of life (Spearman coefficient: 0.3-0.6) and no or minor correlations with scores for cognition, depression or activities of daily living (r<0.3). The original five-factor model could not be confirmed.

CONCLUSION: The DQoL can be used in dementia research for assessing positive and negative affect, feelings of belonging and self-esteem. The findings suggest further research to improve the structure of the scales aesthetics, feelings of belonging and self-esteem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-384
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

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