Physical Activity After Surgery for Severe Obesity: The Role of Exercise Cognitions

Eveline J. Wouters, Junilla K. Larsen, Hanna Zijlstra, Bert van Ramshorst, Rinie Geenen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background
Physical activity after bariatric surgery is associated with sustained weight loss and improved quality of life. Some bariatric patients engage insufficiently in physical activity. This may be due to exercise cognitions, i.e., specific beliefs about benefits of and barriers to physical exercise. The aim of this study was to examine whether and to what extent both physical activity and exercise cognitions changed at 1 and 2 years post-surgery and whether exercise cognitions predict physical activity.

Methods
Forty-two bariatric patients (38 women, 4 men; mean age 38 ± 8 years, mean body mass index prior to surgery 47 ± 6 kg/m2) filled out self-report instruments to examine physical activity and exercise cognitions pre- and post-surgery.

Results
A large increase in physical activity and favorable changes in exercise cognitions were observed after surgery, viz. a decrease of fear of injury and embarrassment and an increase of the perception of exercise benefits and confidence in exercising. Perceiving less exercise benefits and having less confidence in exercising before surgery predicted less physical activity 2 years after surgery. High fear of injury 1 year after surgery predicted less physical activity 2 years after surgery.

Conclusions
After bariatric surgery, favorable changes in physical activity and beliefs about the benefits and barriers of exercising are observed. Our results suggest that targeting exercise cognitions before and after surgery might be relevant to improve physical activity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1894-1899
JournalObesity Surgery: The Journal of Metabolic Surgery and Allied Care
Volume21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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