Res Publica ex Machina: On Neocybernetic Governance and the End of Politics: Smart States

Felix Maschewski, Anna-Verena Nosthoff

Research output: Non-textual form & short web contentWeb publication/siteAcademic

16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In 2017, Denmark sent the first digital ambassador, Casper Klynge, to Silicon Valley. The aim of this move of ‘techplomacy’ was, as Klynge explained, not simply to distribute greetings notes by the Danish queen. Rather, the intention was to ‘update diplomacy’ based on the recognition that a few tech companies have obviously become much ‘more influential than some nation states’. Klynge framed the new political course in the manner of a well-known old but still utterly contemporary mantra: ‘There is no alternative’. In a similar vein, Denmark’s Foreign Minister Anders Samuelson highlighted the importance of the step as follows: ‘Just as we engage in a diplomatic dialogue with countries, we also need to establish and prioritize comprehensive relations with tech actors, such as Google, Facebook, Apple, and so on. (…) The idea is, we see a lot of companies and new technologies that will in many ways involve and be part of everyday life of citizens in Denmark.'
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAmsterdam
PublisherHogeschool van Amsterdam, Lectoraat Netwerkcultuur
Media of outputOnline
Publication statusPublished - 18 Oct 2018

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Res Publica ex Machina: On Neocybernetic Governance and the End of Politics: Smart States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this