Self-construction and interactive simulations to support the learning of drawing graphs and reasoning in mathematics

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In mathematics, sciences and economics, understanding and working with graphs are important skills. However, developing these skills has been shown to be a challenge in secondary and higher education as it involves high order thinking processes such as analysis, reflection and creativity. In this study, we present Interactive Virtual Math, a tool that supports the learning of a specific kind of graphs: dynamic graphs which represent the relation between at least two quantities that covary. The tool supports learners in visualizing abstract relations through enabling them to draw, move and modify graphs, and by combining graphs with other representations, especially interactive animations and textual explanations. This paper reports a design experiment about students’ learning graphs with this tool. Results show that students with difficulty in generating acceptable graphs improve their ability while working with the tool.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntelligent Tutoring Systems - 16th International Conference, ITS 2020, Proceedings
EditorsVivekanandan Kumar, Christos Troussas
PublisherSpringer
Pages364-370
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9783030496623
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jun 2020
Externally publishedYes
Event16th International Conference on Intelligent Tutoring Systems, ITS 2020 - Athens, Greece
Duration: 8 Jun 202012 Jun 2020

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume12149 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference16th International Conference on Intelligent Tutoring Systems, ITS 2020
CountryGreece
CityAthens
Period8/06/2012/06/20

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