The Sharing Economy in the Netherlands: Grounding Public Values in Shared Mobility and Gig Work Platforms

Martijn de Waal, Martijn Arets

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Introduction:
The Netherlands has been known as one of the pioneers in the sharing economy. At the beginning of the 2010s, many local initiatives such as Peerby (borrow tools and other things from your neighbours), SnappCar (p2p car-sharing), and Thuisafgehaald (cook for your neighbours) launched that enabled consumers to share underused resources or provide services to each other. This was accompanied by a wide interest from the Dutch media, zooming in on the perceived social and environmental benefits of these platforms. Commercial platforms such as Uber, UberPop and Airbnb followed soon after. After their entrance to the market, the societal debate about the impact of these platforms also started to include the negative consequences. Early on, universities and national research and policy institutes took part in these discussions by providing definitions, frameworks, and analyses. In the last few years, the attention has shifted from the sharing economy to the much broader defined platform economy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Collaborative Economy in Action: European Perspectives
EditorsAndrzej Klimczuk, Vida Česnuitytė, Gabriela Avram
Place of PublicationLimerick
PublisherUniversity of Limerick
Chapter16
Pages206-213
ISBN (Print)9781911620303
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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